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He helped build a baseball stadium.

posted Apr 17, 2015, 4:52 PM by Joyce Evans
You might know Brad Wilson as co-chair of the quarterly PSAR Property Management Update program. He also served on the PSAR board of directors in 2010 and 2011. 

But did you know that Brad helped build the home baseball stadium for the Arizona Diamondbacks in Phoenix? 

You might know Brad Wilson as co-chair of the quarterly PSAR Property Management Update program. He also served on the PSAR board of directors in 2010 and 2011.
 
But did you know that Brad helped build the home baseball stadium for the Arizona Diamondbacks in Phoenix?

After graduating from the College of Engineering at Arizona State University in 1997, his first job was as an engineer in training (EIT) with Perini Building Company on The Bank One Ballpark, named after Bank One of Chicago. Brad was in charge of the crew installing roughly five miles of handrails at “BOB,” the nickname given to the ballpark. It was Major League Baseball’s first stadium in the U.S. with a retractable roof over a natural-grass playing surface and a swimming pool in the outfield. The stadium opened in 1998, in time for the Diamondbacks' first game as an expansion team. Brad remained on the job for another year to closeout the finishing maintenance and repair details. In 2005, the stadium’s name was changed to Chase Field after Bank One merged with JP Morgan Chase.
 
“I’m a big baseball fan so I love this time of year,” said Brad. “I was very fortunate to work on the ballpark. One day, a friend of mine and I climbed 300 feet above second base to sketch our names on a beam of the retractable roof. About a month before Opening Day, the staff from our company played a game on the infield so that we could jokingly claim to have played the first game ever played there.”
 
Brad grew up in the South Bay, attending Burton C. Tiffany Elementary School in Chula Vista, Bonita Middle School and Bonita High School (class of 1991). He got straight A’s his senior year. He grew up surfing and playing soccer. He has visited Australia twice to surf and traveled to Germany in 2005 to watch World Cup games. From 2002 to 2007, he played drums and base guitar in a band.
 
After working on the baseball stadium, Brad’s career in construction continued with building hotels in Phoenix, Ariz., Santa Fe, New Mexico, and eventually back home in San Diego.
 
Brad landed a job as a senior project engineer with Swinerton Builders to work on the Hotel del Coronado and the San Diego Marriott Del Mar on El Camino Real. Brad also worked for Highland Partnership on the conversion of a 13-story office building into luxury condominiums at 350 West Ash St. in Downtown San Diego. In 2003, Brad earned his contractors license, which has led to several private consulting projects, a practice he continues today.
 
Brad first became involved with the family real estate business after earning his real estate license in 2005. However, on May 1, 2011, Brad’s life made an unexpected turn when his father David was involved in a motorcycle accident near Joshua Tree on a return trip from Laughlin. “I was riding in front when I heard his Harley pedal scrape the pavement on a curve,” said Brad.  “He was in a coma for a month before he passed away on June 8th. He was 65. On the first anniversary of his passing, I went back to that same place and found a map of the area that said the area was called Wilson Valley.”
 
After his father passed, Brad found himself at the helm of the family business, DRW Services Group, Inc. (DRW stands for David Richard Wilson, Brad’s late father). Today, Brad runs the company as CEO and executive VP, while his mother Diana serves as CFO and president. David Wilson was a co-owner of a Century 21 office in Chula Vista in the mid-1970s. He also served as PSAR president in the mid-1980s. He also spent roughly 10-year spans working with Coldwell Banker and McMillin Realty before opening DRW Services Group, Inc.
 
“It wasn’t easy to keep the company together after Dad left us,” admitted Brad. “For the first two years, I felt like I was riding a bull. But, we’re doing better now and getting used to the new normal. We manage about 200 properties. The credit goes to our outstanding employees, both past and present, for helping us through the tough times. Also, thanks to all who came to our family’s aid in our time of need.
 
“I am also most grateful for the PSAR association and the many members who knew my dad and who have reached out in support. The response has been both overwhelming and humbling, and I thank you. PSAR members have been encouraging, offering lots of support. It feels like family when I go to PSAR events. PSAR is a special group. They’ve played a big part in my life.”

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Don’t forget to read next week’s story. Hint: He once drove a prototype Corvette that was handmade by engineers (the model never made it into production,